It’s my last morning in Linyi and I am packing up my hotel room at the Linyi Hotel (临沂宾馆).  

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Packing up my hotel room

Hard to believe that this morning represents the end of three-plus weeks on the mainland.  Now I am off to Hong Kong for a week to meet with some law firms and catch up with old friends.  Last night I went to my favorite Sichuan restaurant for a farewell meal of sorts.  麻辣传说 (Mala Chuanshuo) has been my go-to in Linyi and last night did not disappoint.  

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My favorite Sichuan restaurant in Linyi

What was odd about last night was that perhaps because it was a Friday and more crowded than normal, everyone around me kept watching me eat and as people would pass to and from their tables, they felt the need to pause at my table and give me and my food a longing stare.  I was doing nothing out of the ordinary.  Just enjoying my yuxiang rousi (鱼香肉丝), some cold cooked spinach with peanuts, and a cold tofu dish where the tofu is light and airy, soaking up the flavor of the chilis and vinegar.  I was also celebrating the end of class with a Qingdao beer.  Perhaps it was the sight of a foreigner in his baseball cap and three dishes of food in front of him that he ordered in Chinese that prompted the stares, but everyone who passed by felt the need to run their eyes over my personal space.  I’m not complaining.  I just thought it was funny, kind of like a special farewell.

Now I must leave you to finish packing and get to the airport for a day of travel – Linyi to Shanghai, then a three-hour layover and change of terminals before heading on to Hong Kong.  

I’ll be back from the other side.

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Winding Down in Linyi

June 28, 2012

As a follow up to my last post, which was rather heavy, I thought I would use my second-to-last night in Linyi to write about more upbeat things and share some pictures of the university and Linyi that were taken this afternoon on a jaunt down to People’s Square and Calligraphy Square (书法广场).

We just had our last dinner together, me and the other two professors.  Lu is leaving tomorrow afternoon for Beijing and then Lanzhou to see her family and reunite with her son before heading back to the States.  John is going to be around for another three-week session, so I will probably see him at some point before I take off.  I have to say that it was really nice having company these past three weeks, such a different experience than it was two years ago.  The company made the time go by much more quickly and made the experience less isolating than it was last time.  Notwithstanding the 9/11 comment, they were both really supportive and interesting to talk to about China, especially given that they both grew up and went to school here before leaving for the States to pursue other opportunities.

At dinner tonight we were talking about our students and the state of education in China.  As I may have already written, the English level of my students is so poor is because English language study is being de-emphasized by the university and simultaneously the standards have been lowered for my program over the last three years.  The reason for these changes is that the last party secretary at the school was kind of a risk-taker and aggressive in his approach to building ties with foreign universities, in no small part due to the fact that he was an academic.  The current party secretary is a career politician and very conservative in how he spends money and expands programs, all done to prevent rocking the boat with the higher-ups.  As I discovered when I was teaching in Guangzhou, there are two parallel administrative structures at all Chinese universities.  On one side is the typical university administration with the president at the top and on the other side is a party structure with the party secretary at the top.  At most universities there is usually some kind of tussle at the top for supremacy.  At the better known schools like Fudan, Tsinghua, and Beijing University, the president has a chance to trump the party secretary because these schools are China’s higher education beacons to the world.  At more regional schools like Linyi University, the party secretary usually calls the shots, which is clearly the case here.  The result of this power struggle is that the students lose because they have less opportunities available to them as their school leaders choose to play it safe.

Unfortunately these kids educations are compromised long before they get to college.  It’s apparently quite common for students in Chinese schools to enroll in weekend tutoring because they are not learning enough in school during the week.  The kicker is that these students enrolled in weekend classes that are taught by the same teachers who are not teaching them during the week and for the privilege to receive additional tutoring from their ineffective teachers, they pay upwards of 500 renminbi (approximately $70) per month, which is a lot of money for families already struggling to get by.  The extra kicker is that it is the bad teacher who suggests the student enroll in this side tutoring and if the parents do not enroll their kid, the teacher will make the student’s classroom life even worse.  On top of all of this, if a parents wants their child to sit in a better seat in school, they have to slip a “tip” to the teacher to make it happen.  This whole scheme is corruption at the most basic level affecting one of the most important parts of society – educating the next generation.  If this goes on in the classroom, imagine the corruption that takes place at every other level of society.

So as promised, here are some pictures of the university campus.

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View of main library from my classroom

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View across the Beng River (祊河) towards the new part of Linyi

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Linyi Public Library by People’s Square

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Belles Shopping Plaza, Linyi’s newest mall


Statue of Wang Xizhi (王羲之)
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New high-rises going up overlooking Calligraphy Square

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Arch at Calligraphy Square honoring Wang Xizhi (王羲之)

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 Now it’s almost time for bed and my last day of class, which means it’s time for the final exam.

Houses of Cards

June 27, 2012

A short while ago, an email came in with a link to an article that is an interview with Chen Guangcheng on the New York Review of Books’ blog.  Chen is the blind dissident who left China recently to study at NYU Law School in New York and is actually from Linyi.  To be more accurate he is from Dongshigu, one of the villages that is overseen by the Linyi city government.  When I write about all of these new high-rise towers that keep sprouting up further and further from the center of the city, the land for the towers were formerly villages annexed and cleared by the city government to continue the city’s growth.  Before Linyi grew into the city that it is today, it was really a collection of small villages with the town of Linyi at the center.  To fuel economic growth and boost the profile of local leaders, villages began being annexed and the high rises you see in my pictures are the result of the city’s growth.

There were some things that really stood out in the interview because of the fact that I am sitting here writing from a hotel that was probably built on part of a village that no longer exists.  The massive Linyi University campus was probably also one or more farming villages at some point in time, but are not part of the city proper.  The interviewer asks Chen if he thinks urbanization is beneficial because then people can move off the land to get jobs in the city and earn more money.  This was his response:

No, I don’t think it’s beneficial. Right now it’s a blind urbanization. Cities grow up naturally over time. Now they’re trying to do it all at once. The main thing about urbanization now is to make the economic statistics look good—to build and pump up economic activity.

Chen basically backs up a lot of what I have been thinking and writing about when I look at Linyi’s development, especially versus cities like Shanghai or Beijing that have a more solid economic foundation because they are home to headquarters of large companies, the creative classes, or are seats of government power.  He continues on saying that many times when these villages develop into towns and cities, the people who resorted to more traditional ways of making a living are often left out in the cold as the real estate developers, banks, and government officials profit:

I think for those who go to the city and work there’s a benefit. But the current way of villages being turned into towns—I don’t think there’s an advantage to that. People in the village often rely on ordinary kinds of labor to earn a living, like working in the fields, or raising geese or fish and things like that. So now what happens? They turn a village into one high-rise apartment building and that’s all that’s left of the village. Then the land is used for real estate projects controlled by the officials. Where are the people supposed to work? How is that supposed to function?

I often wonder what people do in a city like Linyi.  Aside from the typical service jobs that exist in any city – salespeople, waiters and waitresses, tellers, barbers, etc. – there are only so many people who work in offices who would earn enough money to be able to afford the thousands of new apartments being built.  Others I have spoken to here say that businessmen who travel to Linyi for work will purchase an apartment to stay in rather than stay in a hotel and those people with enough money will buy two or three apartments as investments.  Fine.  Even with those people purchasing apartments, the fact remains that such housing remains out of reach for many who used to live in a village and are now having urbanization shoved down their throats.  I think of the manager in the Binhe Hotel, where I stayed last time I was in Linyi and his tale of how he works multiple jobs and still did not have enough money to buy an apartment.  There must be many more like him than the people who can afford two or three apartments or the businessmen who fly in from Shanghai or Beijing and would rather stay in an apartment than hotel.  I read Chen’s words as a warning that this haphazard urbanization without the necessary jobs to support it could be a disaster as people become increasing disgruntled about being shut out of life in the place where they are supposed to be living.  

The corollary to this point is the number of shopping malls being built.  If people cannot afford apartments, how are they going to shop in all of these luxury malls that are springing up all over the city.  Just coming off a weekend in Shanghai, my mind is boggled by the amount of conspicuous consumption in that city, but at least the jobs are there to support that consumption to some extent.  I am not saying that there is not money in Linyi, just not the type of money to sustain the level of future development envisioned for this city.  I even wonder if Shanghai can support all the new malls that are going to come into existence in the coming years.  As my friend Paul put it, part of the gamble as a retailer is picking the mall that is going to be a success.  With more and more malls that increasingly look alike, we begin talking about high-stakes Vegas odds because the development is not being carried out with any thought to the local population and what the people may want.  It’s still very much a “build it and hopefully they will come” mentality.  

The building of malls divorced from what makes business or economic sense is a problem in the Chinese economy at large and something I’ve thought about since college.  Many economic decisions made at the top are divorced from what may be good for the macro-economy.  Rather these decisions are made because of political forces that trump the economic, thus there is a heightened likelihood of a degree of failure.  At the most basic level, the need to maintain a certain level of economic growth to ensure that the population remains happy, the implicit social contract that drives China’s economy, is a policy for political survival that does not always jive with economic realities.  How many new airports, coal mines, highways, and train stations does this country need?  The Linyi airport is lovely, but barely has any flights to justify what I am sure was a hefty price tag.  However, the airport is a fixed asset investment and can be counted in the GDP numbers reported by local officials, which in turn get reported up the chain to Beijing and make the economy look like it is humming along.  We were actually joking at dinner last night that the speed and quality with which these projects are constructed ensures that they will have to be rebuilt in a few years so then the government can just count the project again.  That statement was made slightly tongue-in-cheek, but it’s kind of true.  It may take ten years or more for a new airport to be built in the States, but at least when that airport is up and running, it is built to last 50-75 years or longer.  In China, so many new buildings begin to look like they should be condemned only a few years after going up.  I think of the campus of the university here.  It was only a built a few years ago and already the fixtures outside the buildings are rusting, the doors inside are warped, and there are cracks in the walls all over the place.  I can only imagine what a lot of these new apartment towers look like, especially those that are half empty.

Economic policy divorced from economic reality is not sustainable.  It’s easy when you have money to pump into capital improvement projects, but it’s much harder when you need to affect rational human beings.  It’s why the authorities in Beijing have been more successful at building high-speed trains (success in building them, but not necessarily in operating them safely) than getting consumers to open their pocketbooks and re-orient the economy towards more domestic consumption and away from export-led growth.  Having the government build an airport or train line that is eventually going to be run by the government does not require rational policies because all the players’ interests are aligned by the desire to make money, which travels in a vicious circle and rarely trickles down to the average person.  However, getting people to change their shopping behavior requires rational thought because for all of the government’s attempts to control the people, some things are so intrinsic that they cannot be controlled by a higher power.  A person worried about having enough money for health care, retirement, education of their children, and to put a roof over their head and food on the table is not going to automatically start buying more discretionary items just because the government tells them to do so.  For that to happen, rational policies are necessary like state-subsidized health care, better education at a lower cost, safeguards for retirement, and the like.  While the government talks about such social safety nets and academics write papers urging the government to begin using some of its largess to build such programs, they are still not being being created.  Why?  Because such programs will not bear dividends until much later in time and the government thrives on short-term gain in the form of easily obtainable economic growth to justify its existence.

Chen is spot on when he points out that the development path China is currently on is not sustainable because for all the wealth sloshing around in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and other large cities, there are huge swathes of the population unable to partake in this life and the government is not taking the necessary steps to bring them into the fold because they are blinded by their own desire to protect their positions of power.

Half-Assed Expat

June 22, 2012

Made it to Shanghai in one piece. The actual flight from Linyi to Shanghai is less than an hour, so really easy to get here. In some ways it feels like being released out into civilization. It has been four years since I was last here and the city is even more refined and polished than it was the last time I was here.

This is what I woke up to when I walked into my hotel bathroom this morning.

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The city is definitely China’s best foot forward on the world stage with the potential to rival any other great world city. I don’t think I can use enough superlatives to describe the city. Suffice it to say it’s definitely the center of creativity, commerce, and class in China. Part of it definitely has something to do with the sheer number of expats here.

I’m sitting in a cafe called Sunflour on Anfu Road (安福路) that could be in London, Sydney, or San Francisco and it’s filled with a mix of expats and locals. The menu is salads, sandwiches, and lots of fresh baked goods. I’m listening to two foreign girls talk about their trips to Urumqi and marathons in Thailand, as well as their plans for the night. I forgot how everyone of a certain set knows each other when you live overseas. It was the same thing when I lived in Hong Kong, so it’s nice to know there is some continuity to this whole lifestyle.

But Shanghai is unreal. I’m not sure if it is what the rest of China aspires to, especially given the central governments own bias against Shanghai due to it’s long history of foreign influence. Just to recap – when China was forcibly opened up by the Europeans and Americans in the mid 1800s, Shanghai was carved up among the French, Germans, Americans, and British. The city developed a reputation as the Paris of the East and as a den of sin and iniquity. When the Communists came to power, they sought to stamp out all traces of the old Shanghai. When China opened up on its own terms in the 90s, Jiang Zemin and Zhu Rongji, who were the president and premier, respectively, hailed from Shanghai and strongly promoted the city’s development. When Hu Jintao and Wen Jiabo came to power in the 2000s, the so called “Shanghai Faction” fell out of favor and the leaders in Beijing sought to promote harmony, not the decadence a city like Shanghai represents. That’s not to say that Shanghai stopped developing and changing, but the city did not receive the same support from Beijing. Having spent time in places like Linyi, I don’t think Shanghai is what these cities want to be. Whether that’s because of government influence or the fact that many Chinese people have at most spent a few days here, I don’t think this is the way forward for the rest of China.

There is something very comfortable and familiar about the city. It’s what happens when the iPhone class infiltrates a place and starts to remake it in its image. The nationality of the iPhone owner does not matter. It’s a mindset. Without being too glib, the iPhone class likes cute boutiques, gourmet coffee, trendy restaurants and bars, and whatever else may be on trend at that moment. These predilections begin to influence the communities in which they live and dictate the patterns of development. I could really be anywhere in the world right now, which is both comforting and unsettling at the same time. When I am in places like Shanghai, I am reminded of being 22 and an expat banker in Hong Kong. Listening to these foreigners who have made their home in Shanghai, it strikes me as part escapist (whether escaping an identity and life or a dire economic climate back home) and this desire to sound worldly. It’s easy to sound worldly when you’re jetting off to Shanghai for the weekend or running a marathon in Thailand. I’m guilty of this, too to some degree, but I’m kind of a half-assed expat. I like to flit into countries like China for a few weeks or a city like London for a long weekend and then flit right back home.

Okay, enough musing for one afternoon. It’s almost time to move on from this cafe and find a place to get my hair cut and then move hotels and meet my friend, Amy.

Aspirational

June 21, 2012

Week two has come to a close.  It’s a national holiday tomorrow to celebrate the Dragon Boat Festival (端午节).  The festival only became a national holiday in on the mainland in 2008, having not been celebrated since the 1940s.  Since it’s a three-day weekend, I am off to Shanghai to meet up with a friend and check out the changes that the city has undergone since I was last there in October 2008.  It should definitely be insightful to check out China’s largest and most outward looking city.

I’ve been thinking a lot about Western companies trying to crack the Chinese market.  As growth slows down in many companies’ home markets, China and it’s potentially massive market looks more and more attractive.  Some Western brands have been here for decades and for some companies, China is an important driver of revenue.  However, for every company that is profitable in China, there are many more that have not figured out the market.  The New York Times may have been reading my mind when the published an article yesterday about how more companies are moving executives to China.  It used to be that companies had a branch office or subsidiary in the region, but the top executives remained in the company’s home country.  The article describes how that is changing as companies move some of their top-level executives to the region with the belief that being on the ground may make it easier to crack the China market.

Having sent a few days in Beijing before arriving here in Linyi, I was able to see first-hand how foreign companies have tried to crack the China market.  Retailers that would not be out of place on any London High Street or in Soho abound in Beijing.  The stores are not overrun with only expats, but Chinese consumers who have embraced these brands.  There are also many Chinese brands that one can find in cities all around China, brands that one has never encountered in the U.S. such as Meters//bonwe (casual clothing), Li-Ning (athletic wear), Septwolves (clothing), SPR Coffee (like Starbucks), and Dicos (Chinese fast-food akin to McDonalds and KFC).  Will these brands move beyond their national borders to open flagships on Fifth Avenue in New York and Harajuku in Tokyo or will they remain exclusively Chinese brands.  Will foreign brands such as Uniqlo, GAP, H&M, Zara and Starbucks overrun the country because they are seen as more aspirational than local brands?  It’s this idea of aspirational buying that I find most interesting.

Take Apple.  The first Apple Store opened in Beijing in Sanlitun to coincide with the 2008 Olympics.  Walking by the Apple Store when I was there a few weeks ago, the store looked like an other Apple Store – thronging with people checking out and playing with the company’s latest offerings, taking advantage of the store’s free WiFi, and just hanging out.  Once again, it was mostly locals in the store even though it is located in one of the city’s expat havens.  

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Apple Store in Beijing, complete with live music

Apple fascinates me because it is a company that does very little advertising and relies almost exclusively on word of mouth and it’s iconic stores to generate traffic.  There is no Apple Store in Linyi, but the distinctive Apple logo is everywhere.  Every China Unicom and China Telecom shop has it prominently displayed in their windows indicating that they sell the iPhone.  There are also numerous licensed sellers of Apply goods that were not here two weeks ago.  One of the retailers is located in a mall by People’s Square.  I pass by the store whenever I head to the supermarket down there and it’s amazing to watch people playing with the iPhones, iPads, iPods, and Macs as if they were in a real Apple Store.  Apple has managed to penetrate a fifth-tier city like Linyi without even opening a store.  I can only imagine what it would be like if one day Apple does open a store here.  I must say that Apple goods are priced on par with what they cost in the States and it’s not like their products are cheap in the States, so you can imagine that for a lot of Chinese people, their items are still considered aspirational.  

So I go back to this idea of an aspirational good.  What makes an aspirational good and how does a foreign company go about positioning their goods in such a way?  Starbucks, which has huge growth plans for China and is a brand that I would consider aspirational since their drinks are so darn expensive here, even more so than in the States, is trying to prime the Chinese market beyond the first and second-tier cities where it was stores.  How?  Their VIA instant coffee and pre-packaged Frappuccino drinks are going to be their calling card in markets where they do not have a physical presence.  Chinese people do drink instant coffee and like sweet coffee flavored beverages, and it costs less to take up shelf space in a supermarket than it does to open a full-fledged Starbucks.  So Starbucks is planning on introducing these products to smaller cities and whet their appetite for a free-standing Starbucks sometime in the future.  It’s a smart idea and saves Starbucks a lot of logistical headaches in the process.  

Perhaps other Western brands can go the pop-up route much as they have done in new markets elsewhere in the world?  I must get ready for Shanghai, but I think another market that has proven hard to crack for foreign companies is in the services sector, which is something I will blog more about in the future.

For now I leave you with a picture I snapped on my walk home from the gym.

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As I have mentioned before, Linyi has some nice river walks akin to the Hudson River Park in New York.  However, right off one of the paths was this random toilet that someone had just left there.  It would be like finding a toilet bowl on the side of the path while going for a run on the West Side Highway in New York.  Imagine.  Till later . . . 

Intelligent vs. Smart

June 19, 2012

I’m almost at the halfway mark of my time teaching in Linyi and like most things in life the older you get, the time here is flying by.  I’m thinking back to a week and a half ago when I was battling jet lag in Beijing and calling my parents every hour on the hour from 3am until 8am China time because they were the only ones who could soothe my jet lag-induced angst.  Now I find myself re-integrated into Linyi life and constantly surprised at how familiar the city feels to me after only being back for a week and a half.  It’s still an isolating existence in a lot of ways because even when I am around people, I find myself speaking in either halting Chinese or slow and booming English.  But I will say that being back has been good for my Chinese and I find that the lessons I have been taking in New York have actually helped with my pronunciation because I am getting less blank stares upon first speaking whereas it used to take three or four tries before anyone understood me.  Of course I need to think about my tones beforehand because if I just start speaking, it has the potential to end up as a disaster.

I have some downtime because my classes were re-arranged from morning to afternoon, without any real advance warning as is the norm in China.  My writing may be a bit disjointed because there are a few strands of thought that I want to address and I am not sure if they are all interrelated, but I am going to try my best to bring it all together.

A good friend of mine, myBITblog, who has been living in Hong Kong for the past few years and an ardent and valued supporter of my writing, commented on my post last week “Fill in the Bubble” that the American media could be construed as just as controlled and controlling as the media in China and that Americans rarely look beyond the box given them.  I tend to agree with my friend that many Americans do not care to look beyond their own backyards, but I think the choice to be parochial is different than being programmed to be parochial.  Many Americans may not choose to look beyond their own worlds, but they have the option to do so.  If I do not want to read only the conservative op-ed pages of the Wall Street Journal or similarly liberal op-ed pages of the New York Times, I can go out and augment those views with a wide array of opinions across the spectrum.  We may have the opposite problem in America of too much choice to the point where we can pick a news source most closely aligned with our opinions and never venture too far beyond that, but I still argue that the breadth of choice is what is lacking for many people here in China.  That is not to say that there are not bloggers, authors, and others who operate at the fringe of public discourse who present alternative viewpoints, but most people either do not have access to these voices or worse, do not care to seek out these voices.  The New York Times this past weekend had an interesting article about how Chinese writers need to be more nimble to evade sensors, but I wonder how many people actually seek out these writers who are creatively dodging the paranoia of the government to express themselves.

I think back to my student Qi Zhichao who asked me about mercy killings, which required him to think beyond the given course materials.  At dinner with the other two professors from UNH we were talking about our students and state of university education in China.  We have been exposed to the same students during this summer session, so it was possible to canvass opinions on certain students that made an impact in our classes.  If you remember, I had a student two years ago, Karen, who met me at my car every morning, helped me with daily classroom tasks, and accompanied me to lunch.  She is graduating this year as one of the top students in her class and passed her civil service exam with flying colors, so she will be returning to her hometown of Jinan (also the capital of Shandong province where I am based) to work for the government.  Over dinner we all acknowledged that she was very smart, but I proffered that I did not think she was very intelligent.  The difference being that she can take a test like nobody’s business, but she did not think beyond what she was told to think about.  She did very well because she mastered all of the courses thrown her way and worked very hard, but she was not a thinker.  Now I am not saying that there is anything wrong with studying hard and getting good grades, but that does not make a person intelligent.  Perhaps it’s the bias of my liberal arts education, but there is more to be said for someone who thinks beyond what they are told and draws connections between topics to ultimately think for themselves.  Qi has displayed signs of going beyond just what he is told in class, but students like that are few and far between.  Smart does not always equal intelligent.  Perhaps there are more of them at the top schools like Beida and Tsinghua, but I think it’s a byproduct of an education geared to massive tests that determine the next step in your education that leaves little room for people to think outside of the box.  And it is for this reason that I think the media in China can get away with just following the party line without any real push back from the general population.  Sure there are magazines and other publications that offer alternative viewpoints, like Caixin, which occasionally publishes articles from economists whose ideas on the economy may be at odds with the government’s vision.  But the overall effect of the government’s near ultimate control over the media is that a population has been trained to not only care very little about thinking outside the box, but more importantly, not really having the choice to go outside if they so desire.

The education system is one of the main tools that the government has at its disposal to control future generations.  During the same conversation at dinner, we were talking about the poor oral English skills of our students and how they have very little opportunity to practice speaking English.  Apparently the university is looking to cut back on English instruction because they do not want to spend the money, but they have plenty of money to build a new stadium that would not be out of place at a Big Ten school and a golf course in the middle of campus.

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I also found out last night that the students in my class are part of a program where over the course of four years, they take all the classes that they would take at the University of New Haven in the Business program.  Most of the classes are offered in intensive bursts like my three-week U.S. Business Law class, but upon completion of all these courses, they are eligible to receive a B.A. from UNH in addition to the degree from Linyi University.  This arrangement is obviously very good for Linyi University because they can market this program to attract students from all over Shandong, as well as around the country with the lure of receiving a U.S. degree without having to go to the U.S.  The students in the program can also opt to go to UNH for their senior year, but for many students this decision is too expensive.  Now I think it’s a great program for these students, but if their English skills are not up to snuff, how much are they really learning during the course of their studies.  I am inclined to think that as part of this program, there should be a greater investment in teaching English to give the students the language skills to back up having received a B.A. from an American university and giving the graduates greater opportunities that come along with being truly bilingual.  My students complain all of the time that their English is not that good or worse, they barely say anything because they are embarrassed by their perceived poor English skills.  Linyi University should be investing in bringing more instructors to the school to teach the students oral English to solidly position their graduates for brighter futures, but instead the president of the university wants to cut back on this item in the budget and the result will be students whose English skills become even poorer.

Where am I going with all of this rambling?  There are definite problems in the Chinese education system (as there are in the American system), but I think what I am witnessing is a tension that plays itself out all across Chinese society – how to continue advancing as a society while maintaining control over that advancement.  The government has done an admirable job of growing the economy over the past 30 years and moving large numbers of people out of poverty.  However, as the government seeks to position China for the next 30 years, it’s trying to maintain it’s tight grip on people’s expression of ideas and thoughts while moving towards a knowledge-based economy.  Maybe they can do it, but there is something oxymoronic about building a knowledge-based economy when the knowledge is not freely developed and exchanged.

It’s Father’s Day back in the States and I already called to wish my dad a happy Father’s Day, but sadly I cannot be there with him to celebrate the day.  So I can do the second best thing and heed his wishes by posting some pictures of Linyi to give a sense of how sprawling this city is.

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Blue Sky in Linyi

That’s the view facing east from the bridge on Tongda Road (通达路) heading back from the gym last Friday.  The right side of the picture is the southern part of Linyi and heading in the direction of most of the commercial activity in the city.  The left side is north of the river and the new part of the city where the only real tenant is the city government and lots of new apartments.

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This view is facing west towards the university and where my hotel is.  As you can see, there are some cranes in the sky and lots of open space.  The university and bus station are the main anchors in this direction, but a lot of ground has been broken for new housing and in a few years there should also be some commercial development to support the population in this part of the city.  Right now though there is nothing to really talk to from the hotel except for the bus station across the street.

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This hole in the ground is on the north side of People’s Square (人民广成) and is part of a new shopping center that is called Osca.  I tried to make out the meaning of the name from the Chinese, but was unable to initially.  Right now there is not much in the way of development except for Linyi’s first Subway and a new Korean restaurant, but the mall is supposed to be the home of other foreign retailers from Hong Kong and further afield.  Of course there will also be a residential component to this development.  I guess this would be considered prime real estate in Linyi because People’s Square really is the center of town and on the weekends is filled with people. It’s also where you can find the city’s Pizza Hut, McDonald’s, Watsons, the soon-to-be-coming Tesco, and maybe the city’s first Starbucks (this last one is still wishful thinking at this point).  I think of People’s Square as downtown because there are also lots of office towers in the area.

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And the Osca mystery is solved – the complex is named after the Oscars, the awards ceremony in the States.  A bit random, but no more random than a local residential development named Chianti Mansion, like the wine.  Though I did not know the Oscars were such a part of the local culture.  But the Chinese word is Aosika (奥斯卡), so it’s not that far off in its Romanized form.  One other thing that I have been thinking about lately are the artist’s renderings of all of the new construction taking place.  That image above is the completed version of the previous picture.  The artist’s renderings always look so opulent and full of life with grand visions of wealth, happiness, and prosperity.  I know these renderings are supposed to be somewhat aspirational, but the Chinese renderings are off the charts in their optimism for the future.  All of the housing developments look absolutely amazing, to the point where I am staring at the dirt field in front of me and wondering how the developers plan to go from nothing to the most amazing and buzzy mixed-use development complex ever.  I saw a lot of this on the bus ride to Qufu in towns much smaller than Linyi, including Feixian, Sishui, and Pingyi.

So those are some recent pictures of Linyi.  I wish I had taken a picture of dinner tonight while we’re on the subject of pictures.  Lu and I went for Sichuan hot pot (火锅) and it was amazing.  I have not had good hot pot since I left GZ many years ago.  This time we went to Little Swan instead of Little Sheep, our GZ go-to.  Little Swan (小天鹅) is a Chongqing-based chain.  Yes, Chongqing is the same city where Bo Xilai, the disgraced party official was mayor.  This meal was perfection – spicy broth cooking a variety of meat and vegetables. as well as noodles and rice cakes.  I don’t think a picture would have done it justice.  I came back to the hotel and looked up the name of the chain and of course Sequoia Capital, a U.S. private equity firm has taken a stake in the company.  I guess the good news is that perhaps it’s only a matter of time until we get one in New York.  There is already a Little Sheep (小肥羊) in Flushing, Queens, so why not a Little Swan somewhere in Manhattan?

On that note, I leave you all to gear up for week two of class.  Happy Father’s Day, dad.  Until next time . . .

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